Is fibromyalgia a “mice infestation”?

Is Fibromyalgia a “mice infestation”?

My “perplexing findings” so far…

*We have published a review about back mice: you may access a free on line pdf in the following link → Historical Review of Studies on Sacroiliac Fatty Nodules (Recently Termed “Back Mice”) as a Potential Cause of Low Back Pain. Cañis Parera et al. Pain ther (2021).

 My first perplexing finding: NO palpation skills

Since I started the study of the intriguing “back mice” (palpable subcutaneous nodules due to a circumscribed congested inter-fascial fibro-fatty tissue tension), I have palpated many lumbar nodules, sometimes painless sometimes extremely painful. Sometimes single sometimes multiple, unilateral or bilateral. I have shown how to palpate them to many of the doctors around me that have shown interest about it. But I am still perplexed that before the summer of 2017 I was so unaware of the ”back mice” existence because these lumbar nodules are a frequent lumbar finding when you search for it properly. And I am still perplexed that so many doctors, even if I explain them, do not palpate these “intriguing nodules”.

Then how come the medical community is so unaware of their existence? I have noticed how little palpating skills my colleagues and me had and how little I was taught about palpation at the medical university. We were trained to study, to memorize, and to learn strange syndromes of many rare diseases; we had to know the management of complicated patients or incredible surgical techniques. We were not trained to explore properly with our hands patients affected with the so called “chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes”. Somehow the message was “Why bother? Just give them painkillers. They will not die from it…. The hands were not important, just the diagnoses by imaging, the X-rays or scanners had a diagnostic value.

My second perplexing finding: Not just “back” mice exist

At the beginning, I focused my research at the lumbar zone. I decided it was worthy to do a PhD study about it and, in the meantime, I started to divulge the “back mice” knowledge through Internet (web page, YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook). I created the web page www.backmice.info with the intention to share as much scientific information as possible, hoping that this would help to move forward the “back mice” studies with the researchers and to help many patients that search the net for information.

I started an exhaustive literature review at the same time that I was exploring and treating patients. Then my “second perplexing moment” came. Reading all the scientific papers I realized that the painful nodules were not just a “lumbar” finding, they could be found in many other locations: cervical, dorsal, gluteal on the hip, or on the knee. Then we could talk about “cervical mice”, “dorsal mice”, “hip mice”, “gluteal mice”, or “knee mice”.

 Sometimes a clear nodule could be palpated on these locations, but some other times it would be palpated as an induration or a band or a subcutaneous crackling or a simple POINT. But in all the cases the subcutaneous anesthetic blockage would give a significant pain relief. The relief would last for hours or days or weeks (without a clear explanation of this by now).

My third perplexing finding: The constant locations

 Slowly, by exploring the patients, it was clear that the locations where the painful nodules, indurations, bands or points would present more severe pain complications seem to be at constant or predictable positions. It is possible to trace a body map of these locations. Even in other “medicines” as the Chinese or the Ayurveda, these “predictable locations” were described. One clear example is the “cervical mice” that is located to a constant point at 1/2 of the superior supraespinos fossa of the muscle trapezius.

My fourth perplexing finding: All the previous knowledge was lost

 As I was expanding my literature review, I realized that many medical researchers in the past studied the “intriguing nodules, bands, indurations or points of the body”. Unquestionably, they mainly used their hands to explore the patients, so they knew about their existence, and they published their studies and theories about the possible causes and treatments of these painful findings.

I published many of these “forgotten” studies in the web page. Hoping that these may help from now on to further studies. I am still perplexed that so much medical information did not reach our books, why? How could this be explained?

 My fifth perplexing finding: So many names…

As my review was going further, it was more and more clear that “the painful nodules, bands, indurations or points” in the body had been extensively studied in the past, but it also became clear that everybody gave them different names, my God! So many of them, “back mice” (diffused on the 90s) is one of the many names that the lumbar nodules have received.

That, of course, is a limitation to go further in their study “since the researchers did not find simple consensus” and knowledge just broke up into many pieces.

 My sixth perplexing finding: The “mice infestations”

Suddenly, I realized that some of my patients diagnosed with the fibromyalgia syndrome presented “lumbar back mice” that would cause them low back pain. These fibromyalgic patients experienced pain relief with the local anesthetic injection of the lumbar nodules, but also of the cervical nodules or the knee ones.

The name fibromyalgia was popularized around the 90s, before it was named in many different ways; one common denomination was fibrositis (characterized by the presence of painful nodules or points around the body). Why the presence of nodules, indurations or bands was obviated at certain moment of the recent years? Why to obviate such a crucial finding as a painful nodule? I am still perplexed about that. At certain point in history, they decided that the fibromyalgic patients just presented painful points. I considered that a crucial mistake that has probably delayed the proper study of this medical syndrome.

It seems that there are patients that just present “lumbar back mice” and chronic low back pain due to them, there are patients that just present “cervical back mice”, and cervical pain due to them, but the fibromyalgic patients seem to present a generalized affection of all the sites where “mice” have been previously described and studied. If you explore them properly, you will find painful nodules, indurations, bands and not just points. My feeling now is that somehow these patients present a “mice infestation” (multiple sites of circumscribed fibro-fatty interfacisal tissue tension that cause local pain and peripheral neuropathies).

Lets move forward all that knowledge again! 

 

12 Replies to “Is fibromyalgia a “mice infestation”?”

  1. I have had hip, shoulder and sacroiliac pain since my teenage years (now 44; female) which has become chronic over time. I also experience allover body pain, which has been conjectured in the past as fibromyalgia or possibly even MS; however, more recently the preliminary diagnosis is of Small Fiber Neuralgia.

    In 2012, my primary physician diagnosed (via palpation) two lipomas on either side of my low back – the left one had been ‘popping out’ (herniating) and bothering me for years, causing low back pain. The right was asymptomatic.

    I had both lipomas removed via surgery, which helped relieve the low back pain for several years; however, the low back/leg pain has subsequently returned and by 2015 had become chronic again. In recent years, I have also felt that the lipomas in my low back have ‘grown back’ again.

    On a side note, I was diagnosed with Spina Bifida Occulta as an infant – whether or not this is a contributing factor, I would be interested in knowing, as one of my sons also has the same diagnosis.

    I also wonder if a ‘mice infestation’ could possibly be an underlying factor in the intense pain and neuralgia I experience in other parts of my body as well? Interesting work you and your colleagues are undertaking and it is much appreciated! I know that I, and likely many others who experience mysterious pain have found your site to be helpful.

    Thank you!

    1. Dear Valerie,

      Thanks for your post. ‘Mice infestation’ is a why to explain that one of the causes of the fibromyalgia syndrome could be related to the dysfunction of the fibro-fatty tissue causing multiple deep lipomas that can cause neuralgic pain by compression. It is just a theory, but many authors reported that fatty tissue should be considered as a pain causative agent in these patients. In the past, the painful spots were described as painful nodules and the syndrome was named ‘primary fibrositis’.

      Me and my team, due to the pandemic of COVID19 have been a bit out of our research. I hope soon we will be able to continue researching the link between “back mice” and the “fibromyalgia syndrome”.

      I do not know of any relation with Spina Bifida Oculta.

      Let’s keep in touch!

      Best whishes,

      Marta Cañis Parera

  2. hi, I am so glad I came across your site. I have been suffering with lower back pain for almost a year, but I haven’t seen a dr. about it yet. The exact words I used to google search what this pain in my lower back is, was “fatty nodules felt in lower back causing pain”. That’s exactly what it feels like when I push on and around the pained area. The pain is almost always there, sometimes light pain during the day, but the major pain is at night when laying on stomach or back. Its almost like in certain positions the nodule or nodules sit on a nerve and when its massaged away from the nerve its instant relief, but moves right back into the nerve territory, so to speak. I work with children daily at work and a lot of times while on my feet I forget there’s even a back issue until I pick up a child to hold and the pain gradually starts up within seconds and I have to put the child down and massage the area to relieve the pain a bit. It’s midnight here and I’m awake due to the amount of pain keeping me from getting comfortable to sleep. I’m very interested in reading everything on your website so far. Its very interesting indeed. Thank you.

    1. Dear Sonya,
      Thanks for your comment. I hope the webpage can move forward the research about this still unknown issue.
      Best wishes,
      Marta Cañis

  3. Please let me know if there are any medical professionals who wish to study a back mouse subject further. My 20 year old daughter has them and seemingly referred pain down her back/legs. She is at uni in Leeds atm but we live in London.

    1. Hello Olivera Babic,
      Unfortunatly I can not send you to any specific medical doctor. Nevertheless, show this medicals articles to your doctor:

      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27008292/

      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28914351/

      It is important that you search for help showing to the doctors medical articles so that they consider the subject in a serious way.

      Me and my team are planning to further study this subject, and publish medical papers, but we are still at the very beginning of our study.

      Best whishes,

      Marta Cañis Parera

  4. Hi Sonya My name is Charlene and I can not tell you how happy I am I came across your comment it’s 3:35 in the morning and I’m up due to the severe pain in my back and hip I was diagnosed with a lipoma in 2012 my doctor told me it was nothing to worry about I have been having ongoing pain throughout the years and have seen a few different doctors behind it but yet none of them are able to tell me the cause of my pain and I can not tell u how vary similar our issue is you described it perfectly down to the te u said u can move the lipoma and the pain is instantly gone but once you let it go it goes right back onto the nerve and it seems like the pain is always there it’s just so much worse at night I am still looking for a doctor to help me this pain is so unbearable and I’m tired of taking ibuprofen and tired of searching for help and I know the doctors are tired of me

  5. I appreciate your article and work. I had a bulge in L4/L5 and one in L5/S1 reduced by very minimal surgery. The surgeon was able to reduce the bulge without cutting any muscle or bone. (The laminia.) It has helped, but I still have knots in my back which I believe are still causing pain. One Chiropractor (Doctor Bond) diagnosed as back mice. My problem is finding a surgeon to remove them and with the understanding of them you have. Must I fly from Los Angeles to Spain?

    1. Hello Randy,
      Unfortunately over here in Spain, I do not know yet any surgeon that is actually removing back mice. Over here this medical problem is as overlooked as in the rest of countries. Any surgeon could easily remove this fatty nodules. You just need to find a surgeon that is open to try it. We are researching about back mice to try to move forward the knowledge about this entity, but to change things in mainstream medicine is a hard task.

      Show the doctors always official medical articles. Specially recent ones link the ones from this list:

      https://backmice.info/articles-about-nodules-and-trigger-points/chapter-1-5-articles-from-the-21st-century/

      Best wishes,
      Marta Cañis

  6. Hola, mi nombre es Merche. Llevo 6 años con lumbalgia cronica. Me diagnosticaron fibromialgia y fatiga cronica. Engorde 15 kg porque no podía andar ni hacer ejercicio. Estaba desesperada , hasta tal punto que empecé con psiquiatría, pues no tenia ganas de vivir con tanto dolor. Mi doctora de cabecera me derivó a una doctora que se llama Marta Expósito que para mi es mi ángel. Hace 6 meses me exploró y empecé con este tratamiento de pinchar anestesia. El dolor desapareció . No me lo podía creer. Parecía que flotaba del bienestar. Hemos encontrado unos 45 puntos. Cervical, lumbar, brazos , cadera y pierna. Para mí el que me tengan que pinchar no supone nada en comparación con el dolor de antes. Desde aquí doy ánimo y esperanza para esas personas que están como yo. Gracias por este blog también Explica do.

    1. I AM 81 YEARS OLD AND IN APRIL 2020, WHEN THE COVID-19 LOCKDOWN CAME,I WAS GRADUALLY HAVING STIFFNESS IN MY FINGERS AND WAS DIAGNOSED WITH INFLAMMATORY ARTHRITIS AND PUT ON METHOTREXATE WHICH I AM STILL ON AND IT IS HELPING ME !!! WHEN MY FATHER WAS 82 HE HAD EMERGENCY SURGERY FOR AN INFECTED GALLBLADDER WHICH WENT UNDIAGNOSED AND CONTRIBUTED TO HIS DIABETES AND HAD TO GO ON INSULIN !!! WELL HIS DOCTOR TOLD ME THAT HE HAD FIBROSITIS AND THAT WAS PARASITES IN HIS MUSCLES AND THEY DEPLETE THE OXYGEN AND NUTRIENTS TOO IN YOUR MUSCLES AND EVEN EXERCISE IS PAINFUL. !!! I WATCHED HIS MUSCLES STIFFEN UP THROUGH THE YEARS AND WONDERED IF THIS WAS INHERITED !!! I ASKED MY RHEUMATOLOGIST, DR. PARSA , IF THIS WAS POSSIBLE AND SAID, “OH, THAT IS WORMS & BUGS” AND SAID THAT LOOKING ME STRAIGHT IN MY EYES !!! AND THEN PROCEEDED TO TELL ME THAT THEY DON’T KNOW WHAT CAUSES FIBROSITIS AND THEY NOW CALL IT FIBROMYALGIA !!! SOMETHING DOESN’T SEEM RIGHT TO ME ABOUT THIS !!! THE THIRD EDITION OF THE NUTRITION ALMANAC BY LAVONNE J .DUNNE 1990 EDITION HAS ON PAGE 186 INFORMATION ON INTESTINAL PARASITES BUT IN THE INDEX IT IS UNDER WORMS !!! IT TOOK ME A WHILE TO FIND THE INTESTINAL PARASITES INFO. !!! IT SEEMS TO ME THEY TREAT THE SYMPTOMS INSTEAD OF THE REAL PROBLEM !!! NUTRITION SEARCH, INC. JOHN D. KIRSCHMANN, DIRECTOR FOR THE LOVE OF MONEY IS THE ROOT OF ALL EVIL: 1TIMOTHY 6:10 KING JAMES VERSION

      1. Dear Ann Hip,

        Fibromyalgia was named ‘primary fibrositis’ some years ago. The old authors observed that any “infection” in the body (like a viral infection or bacterial infection) could flare up a fibrositis attack. Infection could be a trigger to an attack of pain. Probably, it is due to a general response of the fibro-fatty tissue. Maybe that is the connection you mention.

        When the fibro-fatty nodules are analyzed by the microscope, there are not ‘inflammatory signs’ found or any microorganisms. But the tissue is probably not working properly for other molecular reasons.

        Saludos,
        Marta

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *